Advocating on Behalf of the American Military and Defense on the War on Terror

Do.Not.Read.This.Post.

Unless you have a tissue by your side.

At the Berkeley demonstration to support our troops, a Marine Mom by the name of Elizabeth Kelly stopped me in the middle of my tornado tracks fighting against the crazies who attacked us.

She introduced me to her son Marine Sgt. Eamon Kelley, who was honorably discharged for his injuries, walking on a crutch.

Mrs. Kelly explained that Eamon had recently had back surgery as a result of his service in Iraq, and was told that he could only walk around for 10 minutes of every hour and then had to rest. But because she was coming to support the Marines under attack by the crazy anti-war nuts at the Berkeley City Council, Eamon decided he had to come to protect her. 

Sgt. Kelly stayed 12 hours. He tried to testify to the City Council, but ultimately, because of the pain, could not stand up to do so. He wanted to stand proudly for the Marines and tell the Berkeley City Council how much their words had wounded him.

Despite the help and support of fellow veterans, Move America Forward's Catherine Moy, and many others-- Sgt. Kelly chose to stand down.

He told Catherine that if he could not stand tall, on his own power, and speak his outrage on behalf of his fellow Marines, he chose not to speak.

I have a column about this story coming out tomorrow at WorldNetDaily.com and another article written by Catherine Moy at Human Events.com ...but I just had to share this e-mail from Marine Mom Elizabeth Kelly with you.

... For the past three years since my son was injured he has been suffering from depression.  While at the protest he received an incredible amount of support support and kind words from some wonderful patriotic people. After so many negatives from the younger generation here in California his spirits have truly been lifted.  He is smiling more, and his demeanor has changed for the better.
 
At one time I took Eamon to buy him a T-shirt with the Marine Corps on the front and a Marine picture on the back.  A couple of Patriot Guards were also standing at the table.  When I took out my wallet to pay for the shirts one of them said, "Put that away.  I'm paying for this!".  Eamon said, "I can't let you do that Sir", but the gentleman insisted.  Eamon has been wearing the shirt ever since.
 
The Patriot Guard has been and inspiration to Eamon and one of them invited Eamon to join them as soon as he is better.  One of the Guardsman who was operating a radio with a loudspeaker and playing inspirational patriotic music.  At on time Eamon said a person from the other side came by riding a bicycle and stopped in front of the guardsman.  She took out a flag and attempted to burn it.  The guardsman jumped up and grabbed the flag.  He said, You do not do that in front of me."  The person on the bicycle ended up on the ground, and the guardsman folded the flag and put it in his inner pocket close to his heart.  In the mean time other guardsmen closed in around him so that he could be identified. 
 
We are still talking about that wonderful day, and so many stories keep cropping up.  God Bless you all for the work you are doing.
 
Warm regards from Elizabeth Kelly 

Sgt. Kelley speaks now for himself.

When I came home to the Bay Area after being discharged from the Marine Corps it felt like the only warm welcome I received was from family and a few friends. I was disgusted to see signs and bumper stickers from the left wing liberals. I strongly believe that every man and woman is entitled to their own opinion, but the left wingers abuse the rights that we fight to preserve. I had to struggle with depression when I came home because I felt unwanted and unappreciated. I was made to feel that I had wasted four years of my life because of these people. What I saw take place at the protest in front of the recruitment office in October gave me hope because of people like yourself.
   
    A few days after I had back surgery and left the hospital I woke up the morning of Feb 12th to see an appalling sight on the news. Code Pink protestors and other Bezerkeleyites had gathered in front of the Berkeley city council to attempt to force Marines out of Berkeley, telling them that they had no right to be there. I felt I had to be there to stand up against them. My mother had already intended to go to the protest, but she insisted that I stay home.   I could not let her go alone. I was in awe to see just how many patriots had shown up in support of our troops. The combination of Code Pink slime on one side, and being surrounded by people just like myself on the other boosted my spirits. My adrenaline started to surge, and I became part of a new fight to speak out for those who couldn't. Later that night when I had to leave I felt I had let everyone down because I never made it inside to speak out against this evil.  
 
  The e-mails my mother received put a smile on my face and made me feel like I had actually made a statement just by attending the protest. I wanted to thank you for your kind words and assisting those who took care of me when I was in need.
 
With gratitude and respect from Eamon Kelly