Advocating on Behalf of the American Military and Defense on the War on Terror

Laura Bush may be the most beloved First Lady in recent American politics. Her gentle, unassuming demeanor, and her clear distaste for politics made her a favorite even among Democrats.

But she was not without strong opinions, even if she didn't voice them directly.

Mrs. Bush has a new memoir "Spoken From the Heart" coming out May 4th and I can't wait to read it.

Here are a few reasons why:

"... she writes with dismay of Sen. John Kerry answering a presidential debate question about the subject by mentioning that Vice President Cheney's daughter, Mary, is a lesbian. "Beside me, Jenna and Barbara gasped. They were utterly stunned that a candidate would use an opponent's child in a debate."

She's none too happy with Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.) and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) for the mean things they said about her husband, President Bush. She calls out the House leader for calling Bush "dangerous" and the Senate majority leader for calling him "a loser" and "a liar."

"Subsequently, in a private, one-on-one meeting in the White House Cabinet Room, Reid said to George that he would stop calling him names. But he didn't stop," she writes.

Nevertheless, the Bushes continued to invite both to the White House for events "repeatedly," and "when the Queen of England visited in the spring of 2007, Pelosi danced in the White House in her long ball gown."

She has a few other scores to settle with the press, and she names names:

The New York Times' Jason DeParle interviewed her "in a tone that was adversarial and more than a touch offensive." Jim VandeHei, then at The Washington Post, appalled her in Egypt when, during a presentation by the director of the Giza pyramid excavation project, he "elbowed his way to the front of the press pool, climbed onto the pyramid plateau and began shouting out questions" about Egyptian politics. As an ever-watchful monitor of how her husband was portrayed in the press, she confronted Elisabeth Bumiller of the New York Times for using in a story an anecdote about George W. Bush at Yale that Laura Bush writes wasn't true. "While the truth may not be as interesting, it is the truth," she chides.

Read more at the WashingtonPost.com